Four unexpected ways employee training can benefit your company

When you consider reasons to have a well-documented employee training program in place, your mind might jump to the legal ramifications of being unable to prove your workforce is properly trained should a governing body like OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) stop by for an unannounced inspection. But are many other benefits to implementing a robust employee training plan using innovative tracking software like Conductor Orchestrating Training. Internal communication Good internal communication is key to a business running smoothly. One way you can encourage that in your company is to ensure all your employees are trained to the same standards. Employees generally arrive at your company from a wide range of backgrounds, which can hinder collaboration. Including extensive training as part of your onboarding process ensures all your employees use the same methods, best practices and terminology, so they can better communicate with one another. Employee retention Internal communication is just one factor that contributes to a high company moral, and a positive moral and supportive culture leads to better employee retention. Employees are more likely to stay with your company if they enjoy their time in the office and respect their colleagues. But furthermore, employees are less likely to leave if they know that you’ve invested in them. Giving them the opportunity to enroll in job-related training to help them advance increases their loyalty to your company. Safety If your company deals with chemicals, harmful substances or heavy equipment, it is critical that your employees are trained to a certain standard. Having documented training can not only reduce workplace accidents, but it can save your company from...

How to get your employees to buy into training

As a business owner or manager, you’ve probably thoroughly explored the benefits of training your employees with the most advanced software for training employees and tracking that training. But implementing an employee training program that’s sustainable and successful requires that your employees also see the benefits of the training. And that’s up to you. So here are a few ways you can get buy-in from your employees. First impressions are everything Anytime you implement a new program in your office, the way you introduce it plays a critical role in its long-term success. Rather than dropping by individual offices and casually bringing up the topic in the breakroom, make sure all employees are told about the new program at the same time in a formal setting. That reinforces the importance of the implementation and ensures no one feels left out of the initiative. Call a company meeting and make sure everyone can attend. Prepare what you’re going to say so you can pitch the news with deliberate phrasing to strike the proper tone. Make sure you emphasize that the purpose of this new program is to help employees’ jobs easier, not challenge them by putting extra tasks on their plate. Provide just the right amount of details Make sure you are clear when providing your employees information that this program will benefit not only them, but the company at large. Give them the big picture first and then address the details. Tell them when the program will start to take effect and any other significant dates related to the implementation. Leave something behind Everyone processes news, like changes in...

Productivity Hacks for Small Businesses

Create a healthy company culture Counter to outward appearances, an employee who is diligently hunched over his or her computer screen is not necessarily a productive employee. Many people accomplish more quality work throughout the day when they take breaks and prioritize their mental and physical wellbeing. As a small business owner, you can encourage this behavior by creating a company culture that emphasizes health and happiness. Stock the break room with healthy, energizing snacks or beverages. Provide your employees with standing desks and hold walking meetings outside. Create comfortable collaboration spaces throughout your office building where employees can convene to share ideas. Not sure what healthy hack to implement first? Try setting up a ping pong table in an unused office or in the corner of the break room. It’ll bring employees together, which will lead to employee bonding and, hopefully some idea generation. Use digital tools Streamline your workflow with powerful digital tools. Here are a few to get your started. Asana Asana allows you to organize tasks, projects and conversations. Users can be grouped into teams—i.e., sales, marketing, and development—and each user can see assigned project and tasks. All tasks and projects are stored in one place with clear due dates, benchmarks and assignees. If you just want to give it a try, you can download the free limited plan for 15 people. Slack Slack is a messenger service that will streamline in-office communication. At its most basic, it is an instant messenger in which employees can chat directly or in groups. You can also create communication channels organized by topic using hashtags. Slack is great...

Three ways small business owners can save money

Go paperless The cost of endless printouts can add up, so explore ways you can go paperless. Internal handouts, receipts, and other documents and communication can all be digitized. Not only do digital files cut down on paper costs, but they are easier to store and organize long-term. Rethink your marketing Having a small budget for self-promotion doesn’t necessarily mean sacrificing your marketing efforts. You just have to be smarter about how you spend your ad dollars. With new technology and communication platforms constantly emerging, there are plenty of opportunities to spread your message far and wide at little to no cost. Social media platforms like Facebook, Instagram and Twitter are entirely free for businesses to use. You can put a small advertising budget behind social media posts to ensure they reach a wider audience, but you can accomplish the same goal organically simply by creating high-quality content on a consistent basis. Think of your small budget as a blessing in disguise, because you can’t simply rent out a roadside billboard or produce a cheap television commercial. But you can write blog posts, speak at local events, start a podcast, or populate a company YouTube channel with videos shot on your phone. And in utilizing these free communication outlets, you’ll establish your business as a relatable, helpful industry thought leader rather than a stuffy, glossy brand. Automate when possible Time is money, so make sure you’re using your time wisely by automating tasks whenever possible. You can automate certain aspects of your digital marketing, like social media posts and emails. You can also automate parts of your customer service,...

Six New Year’s Resolutions for your Small Business

Just as your resolution to eat more green veggies can lead to a healthier body, resolutions to improve your company’s practices can lead to a more successful business. Keeping these business resolutions through the year, in spite of the major tests to your willpower that you’re bound to experience, will not only inspire success, but it will lessen the blow when you inevitably fall off the kale and broccoli wagon. Develop company culture Company culture is your business’s personality, and is defined by the environment in which your employees work and the ethics and goals that your business represents. Culture is key to recruiting and retaining talented, motivated employees, but it is also a quality that must be actively nurtured and developed by you and other members of management. You can create company culture by encouraging inclusiveness, kindness and enthusiasm. Lead by example in promoting company ethics and attitude. Define a mission that your employees can align themselves with, so that they’re not just punching the clock but working towards a larger goal. Set goals Use that company mission to set some specific short- and long-term goals. Use the acronym SMART to guide your goal-making. SMART goals are specific (clearly defined), measurable (milestones have been identified), attainable (realistic and manageable), relevant (aligned with your business model and mission), and time-based (given a hard deadline). Define best practices First, make sure you’ve outlined the processes and methods that your employees should use to help your company succeed. Then, make sure every person affiliated with your business knows and utilizes these best practices. For specific tasks, outline a clear order of...