3 Myths About the Weekly Company Meeting

For most office environments, there are a few rituals that get everyone pumped up and happy to be working where they are: coffee in the breakroom, an end-of-week happy hour, staff lunches on special occasions, holiday parties. But, there are also the weekly to-do items that make everyone groan and drag their feet away from their desks, namely internal meetings. Whether it’s to make sure the departments all know what the others are doing that week, or checking in on a particular project, or going over the office budgets and processes, workplace meetings have a bad reputation for being dull and even sometimes wastes of time. The rumors don’t have to be true; in fact, in many cases they aren’t! If you want to improve the way your staff regroups, check out three of the more common myths about weekly company meetings and how you can help change your workplace’s perception of them. Myth #1: A manager always has to lead. If you’re in a leadership position, then you’ve probably been in a position where it felt like you were pulling teeth from your employees instead of asking for a little participation or feedback. So it seems perfectly natural to assume that you will have to be the one guiding all of the company meetings. If not you, then who else? Don’t give your employees so little credit – just because no one volunteers to lead the meeting doesn’t mean there isn’t anyone who could. Instead of making the weekly meetings a general overview of the business, extend the opportunity to one of the senior staff members of a...

How to Personalize a Larger Company

In today’s professional climate, there is no one-size-fits-all work environment. From the home office to a corner desk in the middle of some city’s downtown grind, employees can find a niche and excel at their work from just about anywhere – even from the comfort of their own homes! But that doesn’t mean that the larger companies or corporations have become a thing of the past. And with the rising interest in crafting company cultures to be more inclusive and accommodating, the pressure is on management to make even the widespread team feel like a close-knit unit. So if you work for one of those larger companies managing or operating within a team or department, what strategies can you use to help bring your coworkers together? Besides insightful training systems, Conductor has a few ways for you to bring the whole team up to speed and on the same page! Transparency In any type of work environment, or one that involves a team of colleagues bringing together pieces of a final product or design, it’s important that everyone has a say. Criticism should always be constructive and objective, and to give the best feedback, remaining transparent is key. When you give notes on an employee or coworker’s contribution, be sure to touch on both positives and negatives, and to keep an open mind if you’re engaging in an open conversation about the work with which you were presented. When your colleagues see that you’re willing to see all sides of the coin, and to adapt to a project’s unique parameters based on their interpretations, they’ll feel more appreciated and...