How to make your office more parent-friendly

Offer flex time or remote-working polices With technology like video conferencing and cloud storage, employees around the world can share ideas and files as if they were right next to each other. These advances in communication have made it possible for many industries to operate with some or all of their employees working remotely. Consider if your company is in one of these industries; whether there’s a need for employees to actually be in the office to be productive. If not, allow your employees—especially parents—the chance to utilize flex time, work remotely, or work part-time. Offer child-care If you can’t give your employees the option to work remotely, consider offering childcare at your workplace. This will not only allow your employees to continue their regular work hours, but it will give them peace of mind knowing their child is close by. If you have a large enough company, you can invest in an on-site daycare program. If you don’t have enough employees to make this kind of initiative worth the investment, you can partner with nearby companies to create a program. Offer leniency for new parents When new parents do return to the office, remember that they are juggling their workload with their responsibilities as a new parent. There’s a good chance they’re functioning on very little sleep. Respect that by not coming down too hard on them. At the same time, make sure you’re not belittling them or depriving them of difficult tasks because they are a parent. Let them dictate what sort of workload they can take on. A parent-friendly environment can help immensely in employee retention...

How training benefits all levels of employees

New hires A standardized training program greatly helps in onboarding new employees. They will know what is expected of them and feel prepared for their role. Mid-level hires Your mid-level hires also benefit from a training program, because they can refresh their skillset on a regular basis. The tracking aspect of Conductor’s employee training tracking software is also helpful because it helps employees who have been with the company for a few years keep track of what training they have completed. Senior employees Your senior employees can not only keep their own training current, but they can use the software to track training for junior employees. Conductor’s training tracking software allows managers to access, maintain and manage all employee training metrics in one location. They can retrieve relevant records in a matter of clicks if the need arises.  Sometimes, human resources personnel or senior managers must provide proof of employees’ professional development history, completion of necessary training certifications and specific class attendance records. Conductor’s software allows them to access over 30 reports without the need for software add-ons or manipulating information contained in an external database. The reports are fully customizable for any date ranges, user-defined filter parameters and more, giving you hundreds of options for producing documentation. If you’re ready to see how Conductor Orchestrating Training can help your company and its employees at every level, download our free...

Summer workplace hazards

One of our goals at Conductor Orchestrating Training is to mitigate workplace accidents by enabling easy and thorough employee training. But when it comes to workplace safety, one factor many don’t consider is how season changes factor in. Especially if your employees work outdoors, you will face different hazards in the summer than in the winter. Here are some risks to be aware of as we move into the heat of summer. Heat-induced illness If your employees are working outside, they are susceptible to dehydration, overheating, and other issues exacerbated by hot temperatures and direct sunlight. Give your employees regular breaks; at least five minutes every hour. Provide shade and water or cold popsicles to help them lower their body temperature. Remind them to protect themselves by wearing sunscreen and a broad-brimmed hat. Make sure they recognize the signs of dehydration or overheating so they can recognize the symptoms in themselves or their coworkers. For example, they might be dehydrated if they feel dizzy, extremely tired or have a sudden headache. Symptoms they can watch out for in others are sunken eyes, rapid breathing or a rapid heart rate. Stress from overworking Summer is a popular time for employees to request time off to go on vacation. While a short summer vacation works wonders for these employees’ mental wellbeing, it can leave your other employees stressed as they compensate for the reduced manpower. Carefully document time-off requests so you don’t end up understaffed. The fairest method for handling this is to grant requests on a first-come, first-serve basis. Be on the lookout for employees who are working extra hard...

How to hire and train recent college grads

It’s that time of year when students finishing up their senior year in college are creating their first professional resumes and considering what life outside the classroom might hold for them. You might think there’s too much uncertainty in hiring someone without any work experience, but these recent grads can actually be great additions to your staff. For one thing, if they obtained a degree relevant to your industry, their skillset and knowledge reflects the very latest advances in the field. But to get the most out of your hire, keep these tips in mind. Consider both hard and soft skills If you are hiring in an industry that is constantly changing, like technology or medicine, you will likely be impressed by the cutting-edge hard skills listed on the resume of a recent college graduate. But regardless of the industry, transitioning from using those skills in a classroom to implementing them in the real world is challenging. You want someone who is willing and eager to learn, change and adapt to fit the specific needs of your company. You can glean some of these soft skills during the interview by asking how they would respond to hypothetical scenarios. Implement a structured internship program First, consider bringing recent graduates onto your staff without hiring them full-time. Accepting interns is a great way to do this, but make sure your internship program is structured. Set the expectations of the internship at the outset. Define the internship’s length, hourly compensation, and weekly hours. Also create expectations for what happens when the internship is over. If the intern seems like a good fit...