Tips for organizing the corporate Halloween party

Falling leaves, shorter days and chillier mornings signal the onset of autumn and the approach of the season’s sweetest holiday: Halloween. It’s an occasion for assembling a creative costume and indulging in candy—and why should children have all the fun? If you’re in charge of organizing your company’s office parties, you’re probably in the midst of planning some sort of Halloween celebration. And while these festivities can provide a morale-boosting diversion from the typical workday, it’s important, when throwing company-wide events, to ensure that the fun is good-natured and inclusive. Here are a few tips for throwing a Halloween party that’s both lively and workplace-appropriate. Specify costume guidelines Creative getups are an essential part of Halloween, and, therefore, most Halloween parties. Just make sure all employees are on the same page about what sort of costumes, if any, are expected at your company Halloween party. No employee wants to be the killjoy who doesn’t dress up. But it’s equally horrifying to enter the office decked out in full costume while everyone else is in business attire. Avoid confusion by sending out a company memo outlining the nature of this Halloween celebration. Tell employees there will be prizes for the most creative costume, the most colorful costume, or the best homemade costume, to provide parameters for their costume selection. Schedule a start and end time for the party so everyone knows not to schedule client meetings during this time. Use your best judgment to help employees avoid offending their coworkers with their costume choice. Every company culture is different, but it’s better to be overly cautious and specify ground rules...

Three common scenarios that require employee training tracking software

If you occupy a role in upper management or human resources, part of your job entails ensuring all employees are properly trained as well as managing the repercussions if they are not. You and your business will, at some point, encounter one of several scenarios that not only require that all employees meeting training requirements, but that you are able to provide proof of that training. Tracking employee training with powerful software instead of spreadsheets and documents will allow you to navigate these scenarios more smoothly. In the case of an accident In certain industries, workplace accidents are inevitable, and they can cause impacts and complications that are potentially damaging to your company. Even if employee negligence or company practices aren’t to blame for such accidents, providing standardized employee training can mitigate the chances of accidents occurring. If an accident does occur, having documented records of that training can protect your employees and your business. If legal issues arise due to an accident, you will be able to prove that your company did everything within its power to ensure that employees were correctly certified and trained to industry standards. In the case of an audit Many industries require employees to meet certain training standards as outlined by the United States Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA standards require employers to train employees in the safety and health aspects of their job, to   ensure workplaces are free from serious recognized hazards. New employees must complete this training within the first few weeks of being hired, and refresher training must be completed annually. To ensure businesses comply...